What is a Stand-Up Roller Coaster?

What is a Stand-Up Roller Coaster? Stand-up roller coasters are steel roller coasters designed so that the riders stand during the course of the ride. Riders straddle a bicycle-like seat that adjusts for the riders height and are restrained by over-the-shoulder restraints. They are very similar to seated looping coasters and some roller coasters designed for sit-down trains have also added stand-u...[Read More]

What is a Bobsled Roller Coaster?

What is a Bobsled Roller Coaster?Bobsled roller coasters feature trackless chutes that are essentially a pipe with the top half removed. The half pipes do not have fixed tracks so the bobsleigh-like cars move freely on the tracks as if they were sliding on ice like in a real bobsled course. Today, most bobsled coasters are made of steel, but originally they were made of wood and known as Flying Tu...[Read More]

What is a Wild Mouse Roller Coaster?

Wild Mouse Coasters Are Fun For All Ages At first glance wild mouse roller coasters look like boring ‘kiddie’ rides. They’re typically no taller than 40 or 50 feet with mild speeds that top out at about 30 mph. Unlike most roller coasters that use trains with several cars, wild mouse coasters run single cars that seat four riders (two in front and two in back). Wild mouse coaster...[Read More]

What is a Water Roller Coaster?

What is a Water Roller Coaster?Water coasters have effectively blurred the line between roller coasters and water rides. In recent years, Mack and other builders have constructed several water coasters around the U.S. and the World. Water coasters are typically steel coasters with large boat-like cars (reminiscent of log flumes) and water splash sections. They add a new level of fun for riders com...[Read More]

What is a Shuttle Roller Coaster?

What is a Shuttle Roller Coaster? A shuttle roller coaster is any roller coaster which does not make a complete circuit, but instead reverses and travels the track backwards. Some of the first shuttle coasters were the King Kobra at Kings Dominion (1977 – 1986) and Black Widow at Riverside Park (1977 – 1999). Early shuttle coasters featured a solo vertical loop. Because of their size a...[Read More]

What is a Suspended Roller Coaster?

What is a Suspended Roller Coaster?Suspended coasters were the next level in the steel coaster evolution in the 1980’s. Designers wanted to offer a different ride experienceArrow introduced the Bat at Kings Island as the first modern suspended roller coaster. It opened in 1981 and closed only a few years later due to numerous mechanical problems. In 1984, the legendary Big Bad Wolf was born ...[Read More]

What is a Floorless Coaster?

What is a Floorless Coaster? Floorless roller coasters first appeared on the scene with Medusa at Six Flags Great Adventure in 1999. The steel seated looping coaster’s seven loops had been seen before, but it’s completely open train design was a first. Floorless trains (pictured to the right on Hydra) further enhance the rider’s sense of freedom, or fear depending on how you view...[Read More]

What is a Flying Coaster?

What is a Flying Coaster? Wilbur and Orville Wright had the right idea, but if you really want to experience flight first-hand look no further than one of the ten flying coasters in the U.S. Flying coasters are steel roller coasters where riders are secured in a face down flying position with the track overhead. There are several different designers and the loading is done in a variety of ways. Cu...[Read More]

What is a Dive Coaster?

What is a Dive Coaster?Ever been intimidated by how steep a drop looked on a roller coaster? Imagine staring literally straight down at a twenty-story drop. Dive coasters are steel roller coasters offering drops of 90-degrees or nearly 90-degrees. So far, Bolliger & Mabillard have cornered the market on these extreme drop coasters. In 1998, they opened the world’s first coaster with a n...[Read More]

What is an Inverted Coaster?

What is an Inverted Coaster? Throughout the 80’s and into the 90’s, steel coasters and loops (also known as inversions) were all the rage. Coaster designers were busy trying to find new ways turn riders upside-down. In 1992, genius Swiss designers Bolliger and Mabillard shocked the industry with the world’s first inverted coaster, Batman The Ride at Six Flags Great America. On in...[Read More]

What is a Hyper Coaster?

Back in 1989, Cedar Point opened Magnum XL-200. It was the tallest coaster in the world at 205′. More important than setting a new height record, it started a whole new trend in coaster design. Up to that point steel coasters were solely looping coasters. The oneupmanship between parks was to build the coaster with the most loops. Magnum had no loops, just enormous hills and drops that offer...[Read More]

What Is A Launch Coaster?

What is a Launch Coaster?Those clickety-clack chain lifts are a thing of the past. In case you haven’t been to a theme park in a decade or so, there’s a new way to power coasters. Launch roller coasters (also known as rocket coasters) use propulsion systems to generate speed as opposed to the traditional lift hill. It all started with the LIMs or linear induction motors on the Flight o...[Read More]

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